Developing Leaders – Tom Yeakley

Taking the Mystery out of Leadership

Archive for the tag “authority”

Living Peaceful and Quiet Lives

Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.       1 Thes. 4:11-12   NIV 1984

I urge, then, first of all, that requests, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for everyone—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness.  This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.         1 Tim. 2:1-4  NIV 1984

Paul urges us to aim to live peaceful, quiet lives that shine as beacons of godliness and holiness to an unbelieving world around us.  For this to happen, we must be prayerfully interceding for kings (political leaders) and those in authority that the Lord might grant us favor in their eyes.  For, “The king’s heart is in the hand of the LORD; he directs it like a watercourse wherever he pleases (Proverbs 21:1).

It is interesting to note that in Thessalonica and Ephesus Paul had caused riots and civil upheaval.  It was for the sake of the gospel that he was in these cities and we also note that in both cases it was not Paul who instigated the disturbances.  It was the enemies of the gospel who stirred up the crowds, drawing the responses from the civil leaders.  See Acts 17:1-9 and Acts 19:23ff.

Paul did not want this type of upheaval to be perceived as ‘normal’ for those following Christ in the respective cities.  Rather, the goal, as he reminded them, was to live peaceful and quiet lives; living such counter-cultural lives that they would win the respect of those who did not yet know Christ.

Our turbulent times call for us to be “wise as serpents and harmless as doves” (Matthew 10:16).   And in the midst of this turmoil, we are to be praying for our political and civil authorities – asking that the Lord would cause them to show us kindness and favor.  The result will be the advancement of the Kingdom and the gospel in the lives of many.

Are you praying for those in authority over you?

Kingdom Hierarchy

Now we ask you, brothers, to respect those who work hard among you, who are over you in the Lord and who admonish you.  Hold them in the highest regard in love because of their work. Live in peace with each other.   1 Thes. 5:12-13  NIV 1984

Obey your leaders and submit to their authority. They keep watch over you as men who must give an account. Obey them so that their work will be a joy, not a burden, for that would be of no advantage to you.       Hebrews 13:17   NIV 1984

The Apostle Paul and the author of Hebrews both recognized the leadership hierarchy and corresponding authority in the Kingdom.  Whether is was a local assembly (Ephesus) or a scattering of believers (Hebrews audience) there were leaders in place who were tasked with shepherding the flocks entrusted to their care.

The Ephesians are instructed to be sure to treat their leadership with respect and hold them in highest regard in love.  The final note to live at peace with each other assumes that we will not always agree with our leadership and their decisions.  Whether we agree or not, we are still to respect and hold in highest regard those over us in the Lord.

The audience of the Hebrews letter got an even more pointed exhortation.  They were told to obey their leaders and submit to their authority.  Note the assumption that to disobey or rebel against spiritual leadership (see v. 7) could be a common mistake.  The reason for submitting to and obeying spiritual leadership is that it is for our own advantage.  If their leadership of us is a joy rather than a burden, the resulting actions and decisions will be to bless rather than burden us.  Would you rather be led with a carrot or a stick?

We are to honor and hold in highest regard our spiritual leaders “because of their work.”  Kingdom leadership is voluntary and those who serve in these roles do so out of obedience to Christ’s personal calling.  It only takes a short time after accepting any leadership role before the realities and responsibilities of the job outnumber any preconceived advantages.  Leadership is hard work!

So, how’s your attitude toward your spiritual leaders?  Are you submitting to their authority?  Are you treating them with respect?  Are you holding them in high regard because of their work?

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