Developing Leaders – Tom Yeakley

Taking the Mystery out of Leadership

Archive for the tag “Personal development”

7 Manifestations of Godly Wisdom – 3

But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere.       James 3:17   NIV 1984

Leadership in today’s ever-changing contexts calls for wisdom from Him who is its source.  Kingdom leaders especially need wisdom as they seek to navigate the social and legal ‘land mines’ of our day.

James describes seven characteristics that paint a picture for Kingdom leaders on how to measure your leadership (and others) against the standards of wisdom from heaven.

The third manifestation of godly wisdom is that it’s considerate.

Godly wisdom in Kingdom leaders shows itself as kindness and gentleness when dealing with others.  These leaders seek to honor Christ with their leadership and therefore are trying to model a life of love as Christ loves them.  “And the Lord’s servant must not be quarrelsome but kind to everyone, able to teach, patiently enduring evil, correcting his opponents with gentleness…”  2 Timothy 2:24-25  ESV

Godly wisdom is not harsh or mean-spirited.  It does not seek vengeance or pay back.  It does not flaunt its rights, but rather yields its rights to others, sacrificially serving at one’s own expense.

It is sensitive to its own weaknesses when seeing weaknesses in others.  These leaders recognize their own weaknesses and that tempers and sensitizes them to not criticize others.  “How can you say to your brother, ‘Brother, let me take out the speck that is in your eye,’ when you yourself do not see the log that is in your own eye?  You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take out the speck that is in your brother’s eye.”   Luke 6:42  ESV

It is not judgmental and seeks the best for others.  In personnel decision-making they consider both what is best for the work and what is best for the person.  If there is any doubt between the two, what is best for the individual rules, for they trust God to provide whatever resources are needed to accomplish His work.

Wisdom seeks to place others before self in all areas of life and service.  It is not self-promoting. These godly, wise Kingdom leaders give credit to others for work done.  They continually push the spotlight of attention onto others instead of themselves.

Remind the people to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready to do whatever is good, to slander no one, to be peaceable and considerate, and to show true humility toward all men.   Titus 3:1-2   NIV  1984

7 Manifestations of Godly Wisdom – 1

But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere.       James 3:17   NIV 1984

The need for wisdom in leadership is an easy case to make, especially for any who have tried to lead.  The complexity of leadership in today’s ever-changing contexts calls for wisdom from Him who is its source.  Kingdom leaders desperately need wisdom as they seek to navigate the pitfalls and landmines of both the social and legal challenges of our day.

But, what does godly wisdom look like?  James describes seven manifestations or characteristics that paint a picture for Kingdom leaders on how to gauge your leadership (and others) against the standards of wisdom from heaven.

The first manifestation of godly wisdom is that it’s pure.  By pure we mean clean, uncontaminated, undefiled, not polluted, and holy.  This godly wisdom does not co-mingle the world’s wisdom with God’s wisdom. There is no duplicity in our leadership, leaving no room for accusations of false motives or deception.  We are to be ‘above reproach.”  (see 1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:5-7)

Wisdom from above discerns the ways of the world from the ways of God.  Godly wisdom seeks to please the Lord in accomplishing His purposes for and through us in ways that are pleasing to Him.  At times these ways may run counter to the social or political tide of our days.  We must lead courageously during these times, without compromise, but also without a ‘martyr syndrome’ of seeking trouble just for the sake of our over-inflated egos.  We are to be “wise as serpents and harmless as doves.” (see Matthew 10:16)

Godly wisdom uses the Word of God as the unchanging standard — the rule for life and leadership and will submit itself to its authority.  The Bible is not seen as ‘a source’ for guidance, but rather, ‘the final source’ for instruction on how we must lead.  With today’s prevailing post-modern thought that there is no absolute truth, the Kingdom leader must boldly declare that there is one unchanging measuring rod, God’s Word.  Kingdom leaders who are wise will both know His Word and apply it in their lives first and then as they lead others.

Purity in leadership – it’s first on the list of characteristics for those who would seek to be Kingdom leaders.  Is it first on your list?

In Search of a Balanced Life

Did Jesus live a balanced life?  The following passages would seem to shed some light on the answer to this question.

And he told his disciples to have a boat ready for him because of the crowd, lest they crush him,for he had healed many, so that all who had diseases pressed around him to touch him.     Mark 3:9-10 ESV

Then he went home, and the crowd gathered again, so that they could not even eat.  And when his family heard it, they went out to seize him, for they were saying, “He is out of his mind.”     Mark 3:20-21   ESV

And he said to them, “Come away by yourselves to a desolate place and rest a while.” For many were coming and going, and they had no leisure even to eat.  And they went away in the boat to a desolate place by themselves.     Mark 6:31-32   ESV

As Jesus’ popularity grew, crowds gathered to hear him teach and to seek healing from various diseases – both physical and spiritual.  Such were the numbers and the daily pressures that the Twelve were no doubt used for ‘crowd control.’  Jesus had to remind the Twelve that as they kept many adults from pressing in to try and touch Him, they were not to keep back the little children (see Mark 10:13-14).

To the outside observers, including Jesus’ immediate family members, at the time, He seemed to be ‘out of his mind.’  But, He was carrying out the mission for which He came.  It was just that they did not understand Him at that time.  We see later in Acts 1:14 that they came to believe and understand more completely.  He said, “My Father is working until now, and I am working.”  John 5:17  ESV

In the midst of the incredible demands upon Him, Jesus sought to lead the Twelve to periods of rest and solitude.  He knew the importance of ministry and serving from an overflow and reserve.  Yet, those ideals were often met with the pressing needs of others seeking His help.  It’s no wonder that He could fall sound asleep on a boat in the midst of a storm on the lake (Mark 4:37ff) or that the disciples had a hard time keeping their eyes open when asked to pray late into the night (Mark 14:37ff).

So, did Jesus live a balanced life?  It depends on what you mean by ‘balanced.”  Did Jesus have times of intense schedule and pressing demands?  Yes.  Did He appear to others to be ‘out of balance’ at times?  Yes.  But, He also sought to model for others one who worked hard and yet, took time away for rest.

Paul reminds us, “… I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received.”   Ephesians 4:1   ESV

Doing Well

If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you are doing well.     James 2:8   ESV

Last week we looked at Doing Good – especially in the context of Jesus who “went about doing good” (see Acts 10:38).  Doing good is ‘what’ Jesus did.  James draws our attention to the ‘how’ of that which we do.  We can know if we are doing well.

James sets the context for us by addressing the ‘second commandment’ (see Matthew 22:36-40) that sums up all the Law and the Prophets.  The greatest commandment is to love God with all that we have.  The second is to love your neighbor as you love yourself.  James refers to this as the “royal law of Scripture.”  Quite the label, for sure!

Note that we will fulfill this ‘royal law’ if we actually do it.  It’s not enough just to know it, give it intellectual assent and agree with it.  We have to put it into practice.  We are to love others as we love ourselves.  In so doing, we are doing well.  So, what does this look like for Kingdom leaders?

First, it means that our leadership is not focused upon ourselves, but upon others.  It’s not about ‘me, the leader’ but rather, it’s about those we lead.  Yes, I love myself.  But, that is the standard from which to measure my love for others.  To paraphrase the Golden Rule, we lead others the way we would like to be led” (see Luke 6:31).

Secondly, we use our leadership authority and influence to serve and help others in the midst of accomplishing our mission.  Yes, finishing the task is important.  But, we don’t do so at the expense of those we lead or serve with.  Those we lead are not a means to an end (mission accomplished), but they too are an end – in loving and serving them as we complete mission together.

If we lead others well – loving them as we love ourselves – and if we lead others the way we would want someone to lead us – if we use our leadership to serve, not use those we lead, then we are doing well.

As you go about doing good, are you doing well?

 

Doing Good

… God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power.  He went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him.     Acts 10:38  ESV

See that no one repays anyone evil for evil, but always seek to do good to one another and to everyone.     1 Thessalonians 5:15   ESV

So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith.   Galatians 6:10   ESV

For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.   Ephesians 2:10   ESV

Doing good is not a way to salvation of our souls… let’s be clear.  But, doing good is to be a lifestyle of those of us who have put our faith and trust in Christ.  Faith in Christ is the engine of the ‘salvation train’, but a train car that follows that engine is good works towards others.

Note that Jesus modeled doing good to others.  His message was one of faith in Him as the Messiah and salvation as a free gift, not by following works of the Law.  But, He did good to those around Him – healing and giving Himself away to those in need.

Paul reminds us also that we are to be doing good to everyone – especially those who are of the household of faith.  It’s interesting that ‘doing good’ is not defined.  It’s assumed that we will understand what is good to do and conversely, what is not good.

As Kingdom leaders we have access to resources and authority to do good in ways others can’t.  We can make the exception to the policy, we can reward others when not expected, we can help when others are incapable of helping themselves, and we can open doors of opportunity for those who need a boost.

Doing good to others is the lifestyle of all Christ followers and a part of our mission on earth.  And it is the special privilege of Kingdom leaders who represent the King of Kings!  Are you doing good?

Help – I Need a Mentor!

Many a conversation with next generation emerging leaders sooner or later comes to their felt need to be mentored for their development.  This is frequently followed by a complaint that there is no one to help them.  “I’ve looked and asked, and no one is willing to help me,” they say.  What to do?

First of all, the absence of a mentor is no excuse for not pursuing your own development.  There are multiple resources available to us online for growth.  We can read biographies of leaders and glean valuable leadership lessons.  We can do personal bible studies of leaders, both good and bad, and seek to learn from their examples.  But, it is nice to have someone to interact with – a mentor who can bring perspective and personal help.

Yes, leaders are busy people with very full schedules.  Few are looking for mentoring opportunities.  What to do?  Here’s my suggestion.

Identify someone who you think can be of some help.  Approach them with this question, “Could we meet for me to ask you some questions about how I can be a better leader?”  Note that you’re not asking them to mentor you.  Many busy leaders will immediately decline this offer… they have too many things to do!  But they all have to eat sometime, so invite them to a meal (you offer to pay!) and come with specific questions.  Take good notes and reflect on their answers for your growth and development.

I’ve done this over the years, targeting specific leaders for specific topics of development.  Topics I’ve benefited from are things like:  how to work with an executive assistant, how to select a leadership team, how to lead a meeting, how to manage your schedule, how to lead a geographically dispersed team, lessons learned about travel, how to handle communication demands, how to arrange an office, and many, many more.  All were practical and immediately applicable.

Another frequent objection is that they have never done this type of mentoring.  To answer this I’ve said, “I realize that this may be new for you.  But, you’ve been preparing for this all of your life.  It’s my job to get from you what you have learned by asking you questions.  All you have to do is answer my questions.”  This makes it doable, as they realize that they are not expected to prep anything – they’ve already done the preparation.

Don’t let the absence of a mentor stop you from your own growth and development!  Get after it!!!  And if you do have someone, pursue them – now!!!

Who’s Responsible for My Development?

The heights of great men reached and kept
Were not attained by sudden flight,
But they, while their companions slept,
Were toiling upwards in the night.

The Ladder of St. Augustine,  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

My conversation with this 30-year-old leader had come to a point of discussing his ongoing development as a leader.  “But my organization is not even thinking about my development,” he explained in exasperation.  “When will I be developed as a leader so that I can truly make my contribution?”

I’ve reflected on that conversation many times.  Who is responsible for our development as leaders?

Certainly, God Himself is very interested in our development.  We understand that we are created for a purpose (Ephesian 2:10), and are all works in progress, being shaped into the image of Christ daily as we grow toward maturity in Him.   He is at work within us, developing us through the work of the Spirit.

Our second source of development may be our organization or workplace.  Businesses and organizations that purposefully invest in developing their leadership communities tend to do well over time.

These developmental opportunities can be:  1) formal (academic credentialing – i.e. secondary degrees) or 2) semi-formal (certifications, symposiums, or seminars).  Some workplaces are better than others about providing this type of intentional development.  And even those who are committed to this intentional development of leaders will often greatly cut the budget or staffing for it when there is an overall budget tightening.

But, the primary source for our development must come from within.  We must own our own development as leaders.  Rather than waiting or complaining, take the responsibility upon yourself to be the best leader you can possibly be.  Pursue your development and don’t let any excuse keep you from it.

Be the best leader you can be for Jesus sake and embrace your own development!

Wise Travel and the Kingdom Leader

Often, one of the consequences of increased leadership responsibilities is more travel away from home.  This increased ‘away time’ puts added stress on family, local, and routine operational responsibilities.  How to wisely handle this travel and optimize it for all involved is key to being an effective leader.

1.  The first question to ask is, “Why am I making this trip?  Is it truly essential that I go, or could someone else represent me?  Could what I hope to accomplish be handled via phone or video conference?”  Maybe you don’t have to make the trip at all!

2.  When booking air travel, have you allowed enough time for the seemingly inevitable delays in arrivals, departures or connections?  Booking too tightly increases stress load and decreases enjoyment if you are running from gate to gate to make a connecting flight.

3. When planning your schedule at the destination, think of dividing the work day into three parts – morning, afternoon and evening.  Those planning your schedule upon arrival should be informed that they can only fill two of these three parts each day.  Thus, you will have a portion of each day for rest, reflection, catch up and dealing with any unexpected crisis.

4.  Be wise on what you eat and when you get to sleep on trips, especially if you have time zone changes such as on international trips.  If hosted, you will often be treated with great generosity of sight-seeing events, shopping for family gifts, wonderful meals, etc.  Being out of your normal routines can make self-control and self-discipline difficult.  Pace yourself!

5.  For truly extended trips of a couple of weeks, consider a one or two-day break in the middle of the trip for restoration and rejuvenation.

6.  Be sure your spouse knows how to contact you if needed, especially for emergencies.  Even today, not every place has easy internet or mobile phone connections.

7.  When returning home, it’s easy to think that the trips is over when you ‘hit the front door’ upon your return.  You’ve been giving out for some time and now you just want to crash and relax.  On the other hand, your spouse has been at home while you’ve been away, and you have a lot to catch up on.  If there are children still at home, the one who stayed home probably needs a break from the kids.

A wise mindset is this, when returning home from a trip, tell yourself that the trip ends the day after you return.  That is, you are still in the ‘giving out’ mindset when you hit the home front – especially the first 24 hours after your return.  Focus on the kids and your spouse’s needs, not your own.  Seek to serve them, not be served by them.

When’s your next trip?  Are you planning ahead for more than just how you will spend the days away?  Are you planning wisely not only for the trip, but for your return?

Beware of the Root of Bitterness

See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no “root of bitterness” springs up and causes trouble, and by it many become defiled…   Hebrews 12:15  (ESV)

Life will bring wounds and hurts from others, even those we love and who love us.  It’s the nature of the fall and the curse that we now live under.  Though Kingdom people have been saved by God’s grace and mercy, we are still people in process, being conformed into the image of Christ daily.  To expect to never hurt or be hurt-wounded by another, even those who are followers of Christ, is unrealistic and only setting ourselves up for great disappointment.

When wounded by another we have a choice to make.  We can choose to forgive the offending party or we can harbor this wound, cultivate it, letting it take root in our souls.  This wound now becomes a ‘generalized infection’ within us and poisons our life.  Someone has said, “Harboring bitterness is like drinking poison thinking it will hurt the other person.”  How foolish of us, yet many still hang onto past memories and hurts, dwelling on them and letting these control our emotional well-being.

God’s solution for relational hurts and wounds is forgiveness.  It frees the offended person from the bitterness and the pain of the offense.  While we may not be able to forget the offense, the pain of it is removed.  Much like a physical scar can bring to mind past injuries, when the scar it touched there is no associated pain.

The only way possible to be free from past wounds is to forgive others.  And the only possible way to forgive others is to first, fully understand how much we have been forgiven.  Jesus reminds us that those who have been forgiven much love much (see Luke 7:47).

Is there some offense that you have been clinging too that has taken root and bears toxic fruit in your heart?  Release that offense and forgive the offender, knowing that you have been forgiven a much, much larger debt due to your sin against the God Himself.  The truth will set you free!

New Beginnings

As we begin a new calendar year, it’s good to pause and reflect upon what was and what will be.  It is through reflection that we can gain perspective and see more clearly the overarching, God-orchestrated, macro movements of our lives.

Leaders are often too busy to stop and reflect.  We always have more things to do and people to see.  We take one item off of the do-list and add three more!  Who has time to stop and think?

Today…..now is the time to stop and reflect upon who you are becoming and what you are doing!  Here are some questions to get you started in this reflection time.

Are you pleased with your own personal spiritual walk?  More importantly, is Jesus pleased with your pursuit of Him?  How’s the pace of life?  Do you have a margin in your life?  Are you living and leading from an overflow?  How’s the family doing?  Are you paying the price to experience the marriage you committed to on your wedding day?  Are you investing deeply in your children and grandchildren, knowing that the years for significant influence are rapidly passing you by?

What fears are you trying to ignore related to your leadership?  Are you leading with faith and courage?  Is the vision of where you are leading to focused or foggy?  Do you have a team that is unified and empowered around a shared vision?  Are you accomplishing the mission that you intended to accomplish?

These and many more questions are helpful for taking stock of where you are today and where you need to be/go tomorrow.  Use this season for reflection and refocus as you start a new year full of new hope and new beginnings.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

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