Developing Leaders – Tom Yeakley

Taking the Mystery out of Leadership

Archive for the month “October, 2018”

A Healthy Fear of God

This is the one I esteem: he who is humble and contrite in spirit, and trembles at my word.       Isaiah 66:2   (NIV 1984)

It is a dreadful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.    Hebrews 10:31   (NIV  1984)

Obey your leaders and submit to their authority. They keep watch over you as men who must give an account.     Hebrews 13:17   (NIV  1984)

There’s a certain perspective when it comes to accountability for our leadership in the Kingdom.  This perspective knows that our leadership roles and responsibilities are given to us by the Lord.  They are delegated to us for a period of time and then we will be asked to transition them to another.  All roles are temporary and are a privilege, not a right!

When serving in our leadership roles, we are asked to steward the Lord’s resources – people, money, time, opportunities – for His glory.  We are expected to increase Kingdom assets (growth is a Kingdom value) – see the Parable of the Talents (Matthew 25) and the Parable of the Ten Coins (Luke 19).  And when our leadership is done, we will have to give an account to the One who gave us the responsibility in the first place.

This accounting should be sobering and humbling.  It should inspire and motivate us, as well as help us purify our motives.  It can be an accounting that yields rewards for faithful service.  Or, it can be a time of loss for unfaithfulness and a revealing of impure motives (see I Corinthians 3).

Whose glory am I seeking?  My flesh cries out for attention, credit, and honor from others.  I want to be successful!  But, why?   Is it for the Lord and to advance His Kingdom that I strive so hard?  Or is it for myself?  Whose glory am I really seeking?

Lord – may you purify my impure motives and may any credit that comes my way be rightly reserved for you alone.

What’s motivating you…. really?

Leading in a Matrix

Organizations can structure themselves into one of three shapes:  geographical, functional, or a combination of the two known as a matrix.  All of these structures have strengths and weaknesses.  Wise leaders know the times and which structure best fits the context in which they are seeking to accomplish mission.

Much is written about geographical and functional alignments in various contexts, but I recently came across an excellent work by Stanley McChrystal titled, Team of Teams, in which he describes how he led the mission against terror in Iraq by forming a matrix of many highly specialized military units.  It’s an engaging read and very practical, with an easy application for those in business and ministry.

In a matrix structure, geographical and functional lines of authority overlap and cross.  Where these intersections happen, over-communication is needed to insure common objectives and outcomes. McChrystal talks about creating a shared level of organizational consciousness, where everyone shares common information, with no silos, helping to create organizational transparency which enables easier alignment and accountability for missional objectives.

Having created this common organizational consciousness, the role of the primary leader is to focus on organizational tone and culture, allowing the individual parts to function in their strengths.  When that happens, we will get true synergy, where the total is greater than the sum of the individual parts.

Kingdom leaders today are leading in a world full of complexity that is changing at an ever-increasing pace.  The good news is that we have the Holy Spirit within us to guide us through this complexity.  He will show us which structure fits our missional needs at this time.  We rest in knowing that we are not trying to ‘get it right, once and for all.’  Rather, we are trying to get it right for now, knowing that our context will change at some time in the future and we will once again be forced to rethink how best to re-organize.

Organization structure can be consuming and distract us from mission, if we are not careful.  It is a means to an end, not an end.  We are not looking for a perfect structure, just one that optimally serves us to carry out our mission for the glory of Christ at this time in this context.

How long has it been since you rethought your mission, strategy, and which organizational structure best serves you for the coming decade?  Maybe it’s time for a prayerful and thoughtful review?

Names are Important

As we look throughout the Bible we see many occasions where God determines the name for a person.  On some occasions these names are selected before birth and speak about God’s purposes for this child.  At other times the Lord changes the name of a person when they are adults.  This adult name change marks a turning point in their life as they carry out God’s purposes.

The outstanding example of a child’s name given by God to parents before birth is Jesus.  In Matthew 1:21 we read about the Lord speaking to Joseph in a dream concerning Mary’s pregnancy, “She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” (NIV 1984)  Other examples of names given before birth are John the Baptist (Luke 1:13), Ishmael (Genesis 16:11), Isaac (Genesis 17:19) and Hosea’s three children (Hosea 1:4, 6, 9).

At other times the Lord changed the names of people to signify a new season and purpose of their life.  This can be shortly after birth or as adults.  The classic example is Abram being renamed Abraham and Sarai renamed Sarah.  “No longer will you be called Abram; your name will be Abraham, for I have made you a father of many nations. I will make you very fruitful; I will make nations of you, and kings will come from you.” (Genesis 17:5-6  NIV 1984)  “God also said to Abraham, “As for Sarai your wife, you are no longer to call her Sarai; her name will be Sarah. I will bless her and will surely give you a son by her. I will bless her so that she will be the mother of nations; kings of peoples will come from her.” (Genesis 17:15-16  NIV 1984)

Other examples of name changes are:  Jacob becomes Israel (Genesis 32:27-28), Solomon becomes Jedidiah (2 Samuel 12:24-25), Simon becomes Peter (Matthew 16:17-18) and James and John are named Sons of Thunder due to their apparent volatile temperaments (Mark 3:17; Luke 9:53-55).

And in Revelation 2:17 we read that to those who overcome the world, the Lord will give a white stone with a new name written on it.

Our names go before us and create an identity.  They can create a sense of destiny for our children as we explain why they were given the name we chose for them.  Even nicknames can be important, creating an image or impression, whether positive or negative.

As leaders, we can ‘name’ someone with a nickname that sets them up for positive influence or we can ‘name’ them with a moniker that hinders or creates difficulty for them.  It’s our choice and how we steward our influence on others is very important.

What ‘name’ is on your public name tag?  What names are you using to describe those you lead? Are you setting them up for success?

 

Present Yourself Like a Leader

Then Gideon asked Zebah and Zalmunna, “The men you killed at Tabor—what were they like?” “Like you,” they replied. “They all had the look of a king’s son.”    Judges 8:18  (NLT)

Gideon had a look about him – one that presented itself like a prince, the son of a king.  When in his presence there must have been something about him that made others notice a difference between the way he carried himself and others.  It was the presence of a leader.

Leaders must look and act the part and Kingdom leaders must carry themselves in such a way as knowing that they are representing the King of Kings.  This is not to suggest that one must pretend to be something we are not, nor does it mean that we must flaunt our position, power, or authority.  This will exude naturally as we grow in understanding our sense of purpose, destiny, and responsibility to accomplish His plans for and through us as His servants.

1 Samuel 16:7 reminds us that, “… People judge by outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.” (NLT)  While the second part of this verse is most important, the first part is also true.  People do look and judge at outward appearance.  While Samuel is reminded not to judge leadership potential or base his selection on what he sees externally, people do still look at the externals.

As Kingdom leaders, we serve the King of Kings as His representative.  Those around us are forming opinions about Him based upon what they see and perceive in us. Certainly that opinion will be better informed as they get to know us more and experience our Christlike leadership.  But, first impressions are made and we want that to be as potentially positive as possible.

It’s the hard-learned lessons of contextualization of the messenger and the message when crossing cultures for the sake of the Gospel.  We don’t want people around us to stumble over anything except Christ alone.  Let Christ be the sole offense, if indeed they are offended, and not me His ambassador.

And so, we think about what impressions we leave as we interact with others.  We refrain from having certain public opinions about a lot of things that may detract from our primary purpose.  We limit our involvements in endeavors that may confuse the message of our leadership or distract from our mission.  We are aware at all times that, though we may have many personal rights, we can choose not to exercise those rights for His sake.

Are you self-aware of how others are perceiving you and the One you serve?  Is there something that needs to change to create a better impression?

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