Developing Leaders – Tom Yeakley

Taking the Mystery out of Leadership

Archive for the month “November, 2016”

Leaders Who Have No Time

The management of our time as leaders is truly a management of ourselves.  Time is one of the most precious commodities a leader has and using it wisely is essential to accomplishing all that Jesus intends for us.  Effective and efficient use of our time can increase our influence for Christ.

Yes, efficiency and time management emphasis may be seen and dismissed as a Western culture value and not broadly applicable.  But, Kingdom leaders must address what the bible says about time use.  We want our leadership to be biblically rooted, culturally relevant, and practically effective.  We don’t want to export Western time management methodology (i.e. suggesting all leaders should use MS Outlook software, breaking each day into 15 minute appointment segments).  Rather, we want to export a biblical view of time management that allows freedom for the local context to create or adapt methods that fit the context.

Below are some important principles related to the wise use of time for leaders and an introductory bible study on the subject of time management for leaders.

Principles of Time Management

  1. Plan your time  –  Psalms 90:10,12
  1. Don’t waste time  –  Ephesians 5:15-17
  1. Respect other’s time use –  Philippians 2:4
  1. We have enough time for what God wants  –  Ecclesiastes 3:1
  1. Work by priorities  –  Proverbs 24:27
  1. Plan your time with a margin  –  Proverbs 19:2

Time Management  –  Bible Study

Genesis 26:25  –  always based on priorities as illustrated by Isaac

Proverbs 24:27  –  work by priorities

Jeremiah 31:21 – our guideposts are our goals

Ecclesiastes 3:1  –  there is time for everything

Psalm 90:12  –  plan your time

Proverbs 16:9 – plan, but leave the out working to God

Proverbs 19:2 – zeal without a plan is wasted energy

Proverbs 21:5  –  planning and hard work lead to success

Luke 14:28-30 –  planning is part of being a disciple

Romans 15:23-29 – Paul planned his ministry

1 Corinthians 9:26 – Paul did not run his life aimlessly

1 Corinthians 14:40  –  do all things in an orderly way

Ephesians 5:10,15 – planning pleases God as it allows us to make the most of our time

Colossians 4:5  –  we are commanded to manage our time wisely

Living for the World to Come

What the world needs today is a generation of believers who have as their motto, “No reserves!  No retreats!  No regrets!”  What is needed is a fresh wave of committed men and women who cry out, “Anything!  Anywhere!  Anytime!  for Christ!” 

It will take people who will pay the price to stand against the tide of this world and choose to live for the world to come.  It will take disciples of Christ!

The world today is looking for authenticity in those who call themselves followers of Jesus.  The great crisis facing the world is a spiritual crisis.  The world needs Christ.  But it will only have the opportunity to respond if believers live lives focused on eternity instead of the temporal.

The Chinese character for ‘crisis’ is made up of two other characters meaning ‘danger’ and ‘opportunity.’  The spiritual crisis in the world today does indeed have dangerous implications.  Untold millions live quietly desperate lives, looking for answers everywhere except to the One who can help.

But this time in history is also a prime opportunity.  Never in history have so many been so desperate for answers to life’s seemingly impossible problems.  Believers know the One who can solve life’s problems.  Will they seek to know Christ in an ever-deepening way?  Will they seek to make Him known on an every broadening horizon?

The highest good in the Christian life is not serving Christ full-time. God’s best for any individual is discovering His plan for your life and then doing it with your whole heart!  Some will be called to full-time ministry, but many will serve Him as lay men and women bringing His love into their respective spheres of influence.  Whether full-time or laity, we are to give our all to and for Christ.

Teddy Roosevelt said many years ago,  “The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those who know neither victory nor defeat.”

Will you decide to live for Christ?

Will you choose to live for the world to come?

Living a Committed Life #2

In Luke 14:25-35 Jesus reminds us of the conditions for discipleship.  Before we decide whether we will seek to meet these conditions for discipleship, Jesus encourages us to think things through carefully.  There will be a cost to following Him.  It may not be easy or comfortable.  If the cost seems too much, stop now.  Don’t even begin the journey.  This is serious business.  Billy Graham said, “Salvation is free, but discipleship will cost you everything you have.”

Jesus concludes with a parable about salt.  The salt he mentions is not table salt, but a salty mixture of various minerals.  It was used for fertilizer in the fields or in the compost piles to hasten decomposition.  If this mineral mixture became wet, the valuable minerals were leached out with the water, leaving behind a gravel mixture of little use.  Jesus’ intent is to remind us that we are saved to be disciples while we have time on this earth.  If we don’t fulfill our intended purpose, we are not useful.

William Borden graduated from high school in 1904 and for a graduation gift, his father sent him on a trip around the world with a chaperone.  The elder Borden, founder of the Borden milk and dairy business, gave the young man a Bible to read as he traveled, hoping that it would inspire him as he prepared for college.  During his world trip, William heard the call of God to give up his promising business career and preach the gospel.  He wrote two words in the front of his Bible, “ No reserves!

William entered Yale University where he was greatly influenced by Samuel Zwemer to think about the Muslim world.  William sensed that God was calling him to work with the Muslims of China.  He told his family that he would not be returning to the family business after Yale, but instead would give his life to reaching Muslims for Christ.  He added two more words to the front of his Bible, “ No retreats!

After Yale and seminary, William arrived in Egypt to study Arabic in preparation for his ministry to Muslims.  Within a year after his arrival, he contracted cerebral meningitis and died shortly thereafter at the age of 26.  His mother went to Egypt to collect William’s personal affects, one of which was his Bible.  It was then that she noticed two additional words penned in the front, “ No regrets!

No reserves; No retreats; No regrets!  That is the commitment of a disciple of Jesus.

Living a Committed Life #1

In Luke 14:25-35 we read, “Large crowds were traveling with Jesus, and turning to them he said:  “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters–yes, even his own life–he cannot be my disciple.  And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.  “Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Will he not first sit down and estimate the cost to see if he has enough money to complete it?  For if he lays the foundation and is not able to finish it, everyone who sees it will ridicule him,  saying, ‘This fellow began to build and was not able to finish.’  “Or suppose a king is about to go to war against another king. Will he not first sit down and consider whether he is able with ten thousand men to oppose the one coming against him with twenty thousand?  If he is not able, he will send a delegation while the other is still a long way off and will ask for terms of peace.  In the same way, any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple.  “Salt is good, but if it loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again?  It is fit neither for the soil nor for the manure pile; it is thrown out. “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.”

Three times in this passage Jesus repeats the phrase “cannot be my disciple” (vs. 26,27,and 33).  These are three conditions that must be met if we are to become true followers of Him.  In verse 26 He says that we must put Him first above all other human relationships.  In fact, our love for Jesus must so far overshadow our love for others, that our love for others compares as hate.

In verse 27 Jesus reminds us once again that we must carry our cross.  This is similar imagery to what we looked at earlier in Luke 9:23.  To carry one’s cross means death–death to self.  It means death to one’s desires, hopes, plans, and dreams in order to fulfill the plans Christ has for us.  Finally, in verse 33, He tells us that we must give up everything if we are to be His disciples.  Nothing can claim a hold on our hearts and lives if we truly follow Him.  Everything is in an open hand to Christ, allowing Him to remove or add as He sees fit.

 

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