Developing Leaders – Tom Yeakley

Taking the Mystery out of Leadership

Archive for the month “May, 2019”

Kingdom Wisdom’s 7 Pillars – #3

In Proverbs 9:1 we read, “Wisdom has built her house; she has hewn out its seven pillars” (NIV 1984).  What are the seven pillars found in the house of wisdom?

We find them listed for us in the previous chapter in Proverbs 8:12,14 (NIV 1984):  I, wisdom, dwell together with prudence; I possess knowledge and discretionCounsel and sound judgment are mine; I have understanding and power.  And note how verses 15 and 16 connect wisdom to leadership.

Discretion describes perceptiveness and cautiousness in speech and action—careful consideration of the circumstances and possible consequences of one’s actions and influence.

Discretion includes the ability to anticipate a response during an interaction and choosing words carefully as a result. It does not mean that we avoid conflict but rather that we are aware of possible responses to our words and deeds and are seeking to help, not to harm. Discretion involves emotional intelligence—the ability to monitor how our interaction is impacting all involved on an emotional level.

Jesus reminds us, “Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces” (Matthew 7:6). Not everyone will be receptive to Kingdom truth. We must discern a person’s level of receptivity and share accordingly. We must also ensure that they are wrestling with God’s truth and not stumbling over our method of delivering this truth.

Discretion can be demonstrated by speaking, but it can also be demonstrated by remaining silent. When we do speak, we use discernment, carefully pursuing our desired impact on those around us by our choice of words.

Leaders are often asked for advice and counsel (we’ll address wise counsel in the next chapter). When giving advice, it can be so tempting to tell all we know and have experienced over our entire journey with the Lord. And we can feel so compelled to tell everything now rather than let the process of growth and maturity run its course over time. A wise and discreet person will first ask themselves: What does this person need to hear now? What you don’t say can have more impact that what you do share!

Discretion is foundational to leading with wisdom. It focuses awareness both internally and externally, keeping us conscious of our influence on those around us.

Are you using discretion in your leadership words and actions?

For more thoughts on leading with Kingdom wisdom:  Growing Kingdom Wisdom

Kingdom Wisdom’s 7 Pillars – #2

In Proverbs 9:1 we read, “Wisdom has built her house; she has hewn out its seven pillars” (NIV 1984).  What are the seven pillars found in the house of wisdom?

We find them listed for us in the previous chapter in Proverbs 8:12,14 (NIV 1984):  I, wisdom, dwell together with prudence; I possess knowledge and discretionCounsel and sound judgment are mine; I have understanding and power.  And note how verses 15 and 16 connect wisdom to leadership.

Common proverbs are created to capture some of the worldly wisdom based on experiences gathered over time. For example, “Look before you leap,” “A penny saved is a penny earned,” or “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” all catalog observed experiences. But they have no ability to determine right from wrong or good from bad; they simply operate on the assumption that results are good.

Information is a building block of the foundation of understanding and wisdom. Without knowledge (information), there is no understanding or wisdom. But knowledge alone will not help us lead a wise life that is pleasing to God. If we are not careful, much knowledge can lead to an elitist spirit, an “I’m better than you” attitude.

By contrast, Proverbs 1:7 states, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge.” This fear is not terror or something that drives us away from the Lord. Rather, it is respect—a healthy awe and recognition that God is our Creator, the one with no beginning and no end, Alpha and Omega, King of kings and Lord of lords.  We are but dust whom He has breathed life into. Truth resides in Him and His Word, and therefore we focus our knowledge pursuit on knowing Him and His Word, with an eye toward applying it in God-pleasing ways.

The knowledge that leads to godly wisdom is rooted in knowing God from His Word. It is knowing Him personally—intimately. It flows out of a growing, dynamic love relationship with Him over a lifetime. This knowledge results from pursuing God, loving Him with all your heart, soul, and mind (Matthew 22:37-38) and living a life pleasing to Him. It is the pursuit of God for the whole of life.

In his prayer for the Colossian believers, Paul asked God that they “may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him” (Colossians 1:9-10).

Having knowledge helps us begin our journey to wisdom, but it is not the destination. Knowledge is desirable and good, but it is a contingent good—it is how we get to godly wisdom, the ultimate goal.

For more thoughts on leading with Kingdom wisdom:  Growing Kingdom Wisdom

Kingdom Wisdom’s 7 Pillars – #1

In Proverbs 9:1 we read, “Wisdom has built her house; she has hewn out its seven pillars” (NIV 1984).  What are the seven pillars found in the house of wisdom?

We find them listed for us in the previous chapter in Proverbs 8:12,14 (NIV 1984):  I, wisdom, dwell together with prudence; I possess knowledge and discretionCounsel and sound judgment are mine; I have understanding and power.  And note how verses 15 and 16 connect wisdom to leadership.

Let’s begin with what a prudent leader looks like.  One characteristic of a prudent leader is their ability to assess risk well.  All leadership involves some level of risk, because leaders are leading into an unknown future. They make decisions today that bear consequences in an unknown tomorrow.  Nothing is 100 percent certain.  We never have all the information that we want to make a “perfect decision” (as if that were possible).

We must discern when we have enough information to make a good, timely decision, given the circumstances.  Rashness can lead one to assume that deciding now is better than waiting on more information. And we must agree that at times, especially in crisis moments, we must make decisions sooner rather than later.  But don’t confuse decisiveness with making fast decisions.  Truly resolute leaders move forward only when they have the right amount of information to make the best decision.  Once they have that information, they move forward, not delaying any further.

Ecclesiastes 9:4 reminds us that “a living dog is better than a dead lion.”  A prudent leader can assess when risk is too high and avoid the danger.  Those who are not prudent move forward and suffer painful consequences.  Proverbs 22:3 says, “The prudent sees danger and hides himself, but the simple go on and suffer for it.” (ESV)

Are you being prudent and wise or rash and foolish in your leadership decisions?  The Holy Spirit will help you discern the way forward.  Trust His voice and follow closely after Him as He guides you.

For more thoughts on leading with Kingdom wisdom:  Growing Kingdom Wisdom

Growing Kingdom Wisdom – New Book Release!

Tomorrow, May 7, 2019, my latest book – Growing Kingdom Wisdom – will be released.  The more responsibilities you take on, the more important wisdom becomes.  And yet wisdom seems ever more elusive in a world where values are shaped by short-term successes.  Kingdom wisdom—the kind of wisdom sought and celebrated by Solomon and other wise leaders in the Scriptures—is mapped out in this book to set you on a course for real impact in your leadership and the lives of those you lead and mentor.  Here’s are several links for your purchase consideration:

  1.  Amazon
  2.  NavPress

As a companion to Growing Kingdom Character, godly wisdom for leaders is broken down into its component parts and discussed.  With each component of wisdom there are bible studies and practical exercises to help a Kingdom leader intentionally pursue wisdom from above.

May this book help you lead with wisdom for His glory!

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